The Psychophysical World of the Motile Diatom Bacillaria paradoxa


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Bradly Alicea, Richard Gordon, Jesse Parent
Diatoms: Biology and Applications, Janice L. Pappas, The Mathematical Biology of Diatoms, Scrivener Publishing, 2023, pp. 229-263


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APA   Click to copy
Alicea, B., Gordon, R., & Parent, J. (2023). The Psychophysical World of the Motile Diatom Bacillaria paradoxa. In J. L. Pappas (Ed.) (The Mathematical Biology of Diatoms, pp. 229–263). Scrivener Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119751939.ch9


Chicago/Turabian   Click to copy
Alicea, Bradly, Richard Gordon, and Jesse Parent. “The Psychophysical World of the Motile Diatom Bacillaria Paradoxa.” In , edited by Janice L. Pappas, 229–263. The Mathematical Biology of Diatoms. Diatoms: Biology and Applications. Scrivener Publishing, 2023.


MLA   Click to copy
Alicea, Bradly, et al. The Psychophysical World of the Motile Diatom Bacillaria Paradoxa. Edited by Janice L. Pappas, The Mathematical Biology of Diatoms, Scrivener Publishing, 2023, pp. 229–63, doi:10.1002/9781119751939.ch9.


BibTeX   Click to copy

@inbook{bradly2023a,
  title = {The Psychophysical World of the Motile Diatom Bacillaria paradoxa},
  year = {2023},
  edition = {The Mathematical Biology of Diatoms},
  pages = {229-263},
  publisher = {Scrivener Publishing},
  series = {Diatoms: Biology and Applications},
  doi = {10.1002/9781119751939.ch9},
  author = {Alicea, Bradly and Gordon, Richard and Parent, Jesse},
  editor = {Pappas, Janice L.},
  booktitle = {}
}

Abstract

There are a large number of candidate hypotheses for the movement of diatoms, a taxonomic group of Algae. In particular, the genus Bacillaria exhibits highly interesting movement dynamics resembling a number of physical systems. None of these hypotheses account for the information processing that might result from the connection between environmental stimuli (e.g. photic, chemical, turbulence, and temperature gradients, and mechanical constraints) and motility. Even when there is no significant variation in terms of sensory input, the colonial structure is coordinated and mediated through information processing. Here, we propose a series of perspectives on how the concept of aneural cognition might explain the movement dynamics of individual colonies. More specifically, we can use analogies of neuronal mechanisms such as Collective Pattern Generators, Hebbian Learning, and predictive processing to understand and explore the potential for behavior generation. Quantitatively, these mechanisms can be summarized using psychophysical metrics, particularly the Weber-Fechner law. This analogy could be extended to out-of-equilibrium behaviors such as halting of oscillatory movement patterns, and further interpretations in terms of pseudo-intelligent behavior, which is simulated but not necessarily autonomous. Taken together, we can say that the psychophysical world can open up new avenues of exploration for understanding the regulation of diatom movement.